Heijunka Series

Explains a fundamental issue in Heijunka (Leveling): a) In a perfect world, customers would take only what is needed, exactly when needed, and in the exact amount needed. b) Manufacturers and Service Providers react by producing in a way that mirrors these perfect customers. c) Obviously we don’t live in a perfect world. d) Customers can act erratically and manufacturers react in the same way. Discusses the components of Heijunka, which include but are not limited to: Level Production Sequence, Level Production Quantities, and Level Production Timing.



Uses Walmart as an example of how to fight mura. Explains how Pull, Pace, and Sequencing must be level for a system to be truly level. Describes the dangers of failing to level all three of those aspects in the production environment. >>
Heijunka

Explains a core Lean concept: To create a more balanced system, we should constantly be looking for ways to produce or consume smaller and more predictable quantities. Introduces the concept of EPEX (Every Part Every X). Illustrates key points about Heijunka with a Heijunka Board. Introduces the Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED). >>
Heijunka

Explains that trialing and processing generally takes the most time when performing a SMED. Uses an Etch-a-Sketch to show how studying and quantifying knobs on machinery drastically reduces this time. Introduces Shingo’s method for reducing setup time. >>
Heijunka

Demonstrates SMED with a real world example—pumping gas—and uses Shingo’s method to reduce the setup time needed to pump gas. Explains how SMED is a key component in reducing batch size and achieving Heijunka. >>
Heijunka